Skip to content
warning
16.1.2020 12 pm: Forms related to invoices and reminders of payments are currently not available at the Self-service. The disturbance will be mended within week 4. Contact your local service unit in urgent matters. We regret the inconvenience caused.

If you have an appointment for wisdom tooth extraction, please read the following instructions beforehand

How to prepare for wisdom tooth extraction

  • It is entirely normal that many of us are afraid of dental procedures and particularly wisdom tooth extraction. There are many ways to control this apprehension. If it prevents you from having the procedure, inform your dentist about it.
  • Wisdom tooth extractions and surgical extractions are performed under local anaesthesia. During the anaesthesia, you will be awake and aware of the procedure, but there will be no sensation of pain in the area concerned. You will be given more local anaesthetic during the procedure, if necessary.
  • Do not wear make-up or lipstick.
  • Please note that you are not allowed to eat, drink or smoke for about 2 to 3 hours after the procedure.
  • Please note that you need to avoid heavy exercise for a few days after the procedure. Do not plan important exams or performances for the days after the procedure.
  • The effect of the local anaesthetic may impair your ability to concentrate on driving. Therefore, driving a car or riding a bicycle is not recommended after wisdom tooth extraction.
  • If you are going to fly during the weeks following the extraction, discuss the extraction date with your dentist.
  • You should have non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) available, as you may experience pain after the extraction. Ask for instructions on medicine use from your dentist. Potential cosmetic effects caused by swelling or bruising may last even longer than the pain.
  • Despite the antibiotics, you may have fever during the first 24 hours, but this usually eases rapidly.
  • Contact your dentist immediately if you have severe pain, continuous bleeding, high fever, nausea, diarrhoea, rash or other symptoms.

What to do after wisdom tooth extraction

  • Place a gauze pad on the wound and bite your teeth together for 20 to 30 minutes. A protective blood clot will then form in the cavity. The clot will remain in its place and the area will heal quicker, if you do not rinse your mouth, suck the wound or spit.
  • Avoid eating and smoking for at least 2 hours.
  • Avoid hot foods and drinks on the procedure day.
  • You may brush your teeth on the evening of the procedure day, but avoid rinsing your mouth.
  • Avoid exercise and other physical activity as well as going to sauna for 2 to 3 days.
  • When the effect of the local anaesthetic has worn off, you can use the pain medication recommended by your dentist if you need it. Please note: Painkillers containing acetylsalicylic acid (e.g. Aspirin, Disperin) may cause further bleeding. You may need painkillers for several days.
  • Cosmetic effects caused by swelling or bruising after the extraction may persist longer than the pain.
  • Blood may be oozing from the wound for a few days. Even a small amount of blood tastes in the mouth and colours the saliva reddish. If there is heavy bleeding from the wound, place a gauze pad on the wound and bite on it for at least 30 minutes. Repeat the procedure, if necessary. If bleeding continues despite the gauze pad, contact your dentist.

What to do after a surgical procedure carried out in the mouth

  • Avoid rinsing your mouth, eating, drinking and smoking for at least 2 to 3 hours after the procedure, since this may disturb formation of the protective blood clot.
  • Do not suck or touch the wound.
  • The effect of the local anaesthetic after wisdom tooth extraction lasts about 2 to 3 hours. After the anaesthetic has worn off, there will often be pain, which is normally at its worst during the first 24 hours.
  • After the procedure, there may be some oozing of blood. Heavier bleeding can be stopped with a gauze pad placed tightly on the wound. Bite your teeth together gently. Keep the gauze pad in place for 20 to 30 minutes. A simultaneous half-sitting position and a cold pack placed on the cheek will help to stop the bleeding. If it continues, repeat the procedure.
  • Swelling often occurs within 48 hours after the procedure, but then disappears within 4 to 7 days. Swelling can be reduced by placing a cold pack on the skin for about half an hour immediately after the procedure. This can be repeated at ½ to 1-hour intervals during the first 24 hours.
  • A haematoma (bruise) may develop simultaneously with swelling. The skin may turn yellowish but will return to normal within 1 to 2 weeks.
  • Opening of the mouth may be restricted during the first days after the procedure. This so-called trismus will disappear as the swelling decreases.
  • Despite the antibiotics, you may have fever during the first 24 hours, but this usually eases rapidly.
  • Eat cool puréed foods during the first 24 hours.
  • Avoid sports and other physical exercise for about a week after the procedure.
  • Good oral hygiene will diminish postoperative symptoms.
  • Painkillers are usually needed at least during the first few days after the extraction. Use them according to your dentist’s instructions.
  • Contact your dentist immediately if you have severe pain, continuous bleeding, high fever, nausea, diarrhoea, rash or other symptoms.